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Wise Traditions

Looking to improve your health? Live life to the fullest? The key to good health is found in nutrient-dense, nourishing food, not in processed, food-like products. Host and health coach Hilda Labrada Gore conducts down-to-earth interviews with leading health and wellness experts (scientists, doctors, farmers, physical therapists, and more) to uncover practical tips from the past for optimal health today. This podcast is brought to you by the Weston A. Price Foundation, committed to wise traditions in food, farming, and the healing arts.
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Mar 27, 2017

We are not alone! Did you know that we are 10 times more bacteria than we are human? The bacteria that live in (and on us) play a significant role in how our body responds to stress, food, and our environment. In today's episode, microbiologist Kiran Krishnan helps us gain a clearer understanding of the human microbiome and how it relates to our overall health.

Many health conditions--including skin issues like psoriasis and eczema to diabetes and Chron's disease, to candida, yeast issues, and even arthritis and cancer--can stem from an imbalance of bacteria in the gut. Kiran explains why popping a probiotic pill is not the solution and he offers refreshingly different suggestions for what to do to improve the health and strength of your own microbiome.

 

 

2 Comments
  • over two weeks ago
    Carol
    Hubby has psoriasis and daughter has crohns. Episode should be interesting
  • three and a half weeks ago
    Cliff Montagne
    The Westen A. Price Foundation podcast WISE TRADITIONS episode 69, http://wisetraditions.libsyn.com/69-improve-your-microbiome. , features an interview with a microbiologist, Kiran Krishnan, who says that regular probiotics which we purchase may or may not be helpful for two reasons. One is that they face immense odds to make it through our digestive system and arrive in the gut. Two is that every person has one’s own unique set of microbes which is set in early childhood.

    So he recommends: 1) continuing to feed one’s own beneficial organisms by eating a diverse diet, like early humans did and 2) if one takes probiotics, take ‘spore-based’ probiotics.

    His recommendation #1 reminds me of rehabilitating a worn-out pasture and its soil. With proper grazing and feeding the soil with a diversity of urine, manure, and decaying plants, insects, etc., the remnant native seed bank is often revitalized and the suite of beneficial natives gradually reestablish.

    Krishnan also paints a fascinating picture of the great diversity of organisms we host, and their genetics. The human is not just a collection of organisms, but also hosts a suite of biomes sort of like looking at our globe and all the different ecosystems it supports, and they are all interconnected.

    Inspiring and useful.